Post Tagged with: "culture"

Film Review: The Interview

Film Review: The Interview

March 11, 2015 at 9:38 pm 0 comments
Charlie Hebdo aftermath leads to more violence

Charlie Hebdo aftermath leads to more violence

January 31, 2015 at 10:22 pm 0 comments

Sometime before noon on Wednesday, Jan. 7, two masked gunmen forced entry into the headquarters of the weekly newspaper “Charlie Hebdo” in Paris. The assailants, later identified as Algerian brothers Saïd and Chérif Kouachi, opened fire upon several people in the lobby before using a hostage to gain access to a staff meeting on the second floor of the building. Once inside the meeting room, the gunmen identified Stéphane Charbonnier, the editor-in-chief, and again opened fire. Shots rang out in the streets as Saïd and Chérif fought with police as they made their way to a getaway car parked in front of the Charlie Hebdo headquarters. The fighting in the streets left police officer Ahmed Merabet, who was also of Algerian descent and a Muslim, dead. Witnesses reported the gunmen shouting, “We have avenged the Prophet Muhammad. We have killed Charlie Hebdo!” The men, who identified themselves as members ofRead More

Photo by Rachel DeNino

Reviewing Bob Dylan’s New Album

November 11, 2014 at 10:52 pm 0 comments

In 1966, Bob Dylan crashed his motorcycle. No one knows exactly why. He may have gotten distracted or hit a bump, but he was injured. Several of his vertebrae were cracked. Dylan needed time to recover. Dylan’s motorcycle accident occurred at a time when he was under intense public gaze from the media and music fans. Dylan had just finished up a 1966 World Tour with a backing band called The Hawks, now known as The Band. The tour marked Dylan’s entrance into full-fledged electric rock and roll music. The second, amplified set of his 1965 performance at the Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island still maintains mythological status in the annals of rock history: it marked the time at which Dylan “went electric.” The protest song folk-hero of the early 1960s was playing rock and roll music, a strictly forbidden practice in the Greenwich Village folk music revival, whereRead More

Popular app ‘YikYak’ may be encouraging cyber bullying

Popular app ‘YikYak’ may be encouraging cyber bullying

October 28, 2014 at 10:58 pm 0 comments

Yik Yak is a social media app quickly rising in popularity on college campuses. The anonymity of the app gives users extra freedom when sharing their thoughts. However, this anonymity may further encourage of the growing issue of cyber bullying. The app, launched in November 2013 by two graduates of Furman University, works like a mixture of Twitter and GPS. It puts users in pockets of a one and a half mile radius. Anyone inside these pockets can view comments that are shared on the app by users in their area. As an attempt to prevent cyber bullying, the developers use what is called “geofencing,” a type of GPS technology that inhibits the use of the app in certain “fenced-off” zones, such airports, middle schools and high schools. While these zones are safe from any anonymous harassment, unrestricted areas may feed cyber bullying. “It’s like ‘Mean Girls’ of 2014, inRead More

Selfie-taking may be shifting societal norms

Selfie-taking may be shifting societal norms

October 15, 2014 at 6:56 pm 0 comments

The recent release of the Apple iPhone 6 in September may mark the continuation of a slow technological shift for society. As smart phones become the new status quo for cell phone users, more people have the ability to photograph and record, which opens up a host of potential issues for societal standards. Most people who have social media accounts will often open their newsfeeds and see a flood of close-up photos of their friends, sometimes on a daily basis. The trendy and possibly narcissistic phenomenon of “taking selfies” has swept the social media world and popular culture. The word “selfie” is the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2013, further demonstrating how snapping pictures of oneself, in several different locations and perhaps with several different people, has become a regular pastime in technological society. The activity has even become something of an extreme sport. YouTube is filled with recordingsRead More

Photo by Peter Wojtechko, Jr.

Cancer glamour creeps into young adult popular culture

October 8, 2014 at 2:37 pm 0 comments

A new trend of romance stories about people with cancer and other potentially terminal illnesses is becoming more prevalent in popular culture, most notably in film and young adult fiction. Is there a new fascination with finding glamour in dealing with serious medical conditions? Heart-squelching stories of sickness, like John Green’s book-turned-movie “The Fault in Our Stars,” that shake viewers’ emotional stability have become more visible on book stands and on screen. The television show “Red Band Society” is another example of this theme. The program, which premiered on Fox on Sept. 17 for the 2014-2015 television season, is a dramatic comedy centered around a group of teenagers living in a pediatric ward. The characters bond with each other during their long-term stay. After a sequence of teen drama-related conflicts, the kids form a friendship society, coming together through the red bands they wear on their wrists. The show hasRead More

Photo by Peter Wojtechko, Jr.

A Monk Remembered: Brother Nathan Cochran’s Legacy

October 2, 2014 at 8:31 pm 0 comments

In late July, Saint Vincent College Art Professor and Director Brother Nathan Cochran, O.S.B., passed away at age 57. When Saint Vincent students, faculty and art patrons in the community attend a performance from the Saint Vincent College Concert Series, come to see an art exhibit at the Saint Vincent Gallery or simply walk the halls of the college, they can see that the memory of the late Cochran remains present and clear. All around campus, numerous displays honoring the Benedictine monk’s memory have been set up, such as a gallery PowerPoint slideshow tribute of photos, a portrait of him hung in a stairwell leading up to Placid Hall and a display of his habit along with a sketch of his portrait in the glass display outside the gallery on the third floor of the Carey Center. Saint Vincent Summer Theatre dedicated the run of the final show of theRead More

Photo by Rachel DeNino

Ann Holmes returns to the SVC community

October 2, 2014 at 8:25 pm 0 comments

This year, Saint Vincent College welcomed back Ann Holmes as the new Director of the Saint Vincent College Concert Series and Administrative Director of the Saint Vincent Gallery. Holmes, who worked as the Concert Manager before leaving in 2007, is taking up the positions after the recent passing of Brother Nathan Cochran, O.S.B., who previously held them. As the director of the Saint Vincent College Concert series, Holmes works closely with Father Cyprian Constantine, O.S.B. and Ben Schachter to put together the entire concert series. Constantine is the chairperson of the Music Department, and Schachter is the chairperson of the Visual Arts department. When it comes to looking for artists to perform in the series, Holmes said she works “to identify and schedule excellent, engaging classical musicians to appear on campus.” Holmes schedules the eight performers one or two years in advance, and makes all of the arrangements for theirRead More

Photo by Fineline Multimedia, Lori Ostroski

Yo-Yo Ma gives recital at SVC, receives honors

September 24, 2014 at 10:16 pm 0 comments

Internationally celebrated cellist Yo-Yo Ma came to Saint Vincent College on May 23. Ma became the first recipient of the Fred Rogers Legacy Award and gave a recital in the Saint Vincent Basilica. The recital was held to raise money to support the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media through the Rogers Early Career Fellows Program and the Fred Rogers Scholars Program. The money raised from the event exceeded the initial goal of 1 million dollars. The award was created and given to celebrate the ten-year anniversary of the founding of the Fred Rogers Center. “It started off: ‘how do we create an award that really represents Fred?’” said Rick Fernandes, the executive director of the Fred Rogers Center. “So it really was about the Fred Rogers Legacy Award and who represents Fred’s values and what Fred stood for, and then you start thinking, ‘okay, who isRead More

2014 OSCAR PREDICTIONS

February 18, 2014 at 2:15 am 0 comments

“Awards season” is less of a season and more of a half-year event, but that’s all the better for us lovers of television and film. The biggest awards show of them all is just around the corner: the Oscars. This year, the 86th annual Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, with host Ellen DeGeneres, will air Sunday, March 2. Predicting who will win the Academy Awards is part getting into the mind of the Academy (this includes 6,000 artists and professionals who help bring movies to life… so good luck with that) and part making your own judgment calls. Here are some off-hand guesses in the three most important categories, brought to you by a lowly, film-loving college punk.   Best Film What the Academy Will Choose: “12 Years a Slave” The biggest Oscar battle this year: “Gravity” vs. “12 Years a Slave.”Read More